Namibia

Elimination Target Year

Country Overview

  • Namibia achieved a 97% decline in malaria cases between 2001 and 2011, and is aiming to eliminate malaria by 2020
  • 72% of the total population are living in areas of active transmission (Total population: 2.46 million).
  • Namibia experienced a 98 percent decrease in reported malaria cases between 2001 and 2011 from 735,510 to 14,409. During the same period, malaria deaths decreased by 98 percent from 1,747 to 36 – far surpassing the country’s national targets.
  • Most of Namibia’s malaria cases occur during the rainy season between January and April and are concentrated in the northern region of the country.
  • Although Namibia has made significant progress over the last decade, the ongoing threat of malaria importation from across the country’s borders is a key barrier to achieving elimination. However, malaria burden remains low in past three years from 2017 to 2019; 66141 cases reported in 2017, 36451 in 2018 and 3404 in 2019.

Elimination Strategies Implemented

Since 2006, Namibia has made significant improvements in improving coverage of malaria interventions among most at risk populations, including pregnant women, children under five, people living with HIV, and those living in hard to reach areas. Intervention efforts include vector control through indoor residual spraying (IRS), promotion of long – lasting insecticide treated nets, diagnosis and treatment, surveillance and epidemic preparedness, detection and response.

The national malaria control programme is leading an effort to identify and prioritize the most affected areas in the malaria endemic regions and to prevent potential outbreaks through case-based surveillance and active screening to find hotspots of transmission, and community mobilization in support of prevention methods.

Best Practices

  • There has been increased community case management (testing and treating) for malaria through Health Extension Workers.
  • Namibia has adopted the use of primaquine for radical treatment of P.vivax